[Excerpts from:]
George H. Tinkham, History of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the present (1921)

(c) 2012, Mike Barkley
http://archive.org/stream/historyofstanisl00tink/historyofstanisl00tink_djvu.txt

[this is the OCR text version, - click on "See other formats" for pdf, etc.; I've taken the following excerpts from the OCR and fixed OCR errors where I've caught them]

p. 54. . . .Some of the losses of the cattlemen may be noted in the experience of William K. Wallis, who located in the county in 1855. He learned the great value of the Stanislaus pasture lands while he was engaged in the butcher business at Sullivan's Creek. In time he and his brother had about 2,000 head of cattle. In 1860 they concluded to dissolve partnership, but before the dissolution was completed they lost nearly 1,500 cattle by the flood of 1862 and the drouth of 1864. . . .

[p. 67 the bulk of Empire City was washed away by the flood of January 1852]

p. 74 The Knights Ferry Flour Mill The most prominent industry of Knights Ferry and one that made it famous throughout the mines was the Stanislaus Flour Mill, constructed in 1854 by Locke & Dent. The mill and the wooden dam just above it were washed away in the flood of 1862. . . .

Tulloch's Stone Flour Mill
Some years after the flood had washed away the old mill, David J. Tulloch, a millwright by trade, who had been engaged in mining since 1858, at Knights Ferry concluded to engage in his former business. At this time there lived in Chinese Camp a first class stone cutter and brick mason, an Englishman named Thomas Vinson. "He erected nearly all of the brick buirdings in Chinese Camp," said an old resident, W. H. Hosmer, "and built the old abutments for the 'old bridge' across the Stanislaus River, which was swept away by the flood of 1862." . . . .

p. 79 . . .The first bridge in the county was at Knights Ferry. It was washed away in the flood of 1862 and subsequently the present bridge at that point was built. In 1858 John Lovall, who had a ferry on the Lower Stanislaus, built a bridge across the stream at a cost of $12,000. This bridge went out on the flood tide of 1862. . . .

p. 221 Smith that year came to California and, locating at Knights Ferry, he and Monell Locke assisted in building the flour mill that was washed out in the flood of 1862. . . .

p. 235 JOHN SERVICE.. . . In partnership with Ed. Hill, he turned to farming, owning a small farm on Placer Creek, the improvements of which were completely washed away in the flood of 1862. . . .

p. 266 ALBERT L. CRESSEY. . . . He herded his stock over the plains where there were antelope, deer and bear, even grizzlies in the mountains, and he also lived through the flood of 1862. He went shopping in Stockton in a rowboat and even rowed his boat into the stores and out again, bringing home the necessary goods. . . .

p. 1031 MRS. HENRIETTA DUCOT. . . . at French Bar [La Grange] who gave most of his time to farming and gardening. Peter Ducot was a good and very able man; and it is related that during the great flood of 1862, at the risk of his own life, he rowed a boat out to a tree in the bottom-land of the Tuolumne River, then a raging flood, and rescued a man, a boy and a dog Dr. Booth, Dr. Booth's son and their pet. who were perched in a tree where they had taken refuge from the mad torrent. He made two attempts before he succeeded in the rescue ; in the first attempt, the strong current swept his boat past the tree ; but he exerted all his strength and brought the boat up a second time to the tree, where men and beast had been two and a half days. Within a half hour after the rescue, the tree sank, its roots washed out. . . .

--Mike Barkley, 167 N. Sheridan Ave., Manteca, CA 95336 (H) 209/823-4817
mjbarkl@inreach.com
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